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consequences of changes in election procedures. we almost always get what we think we're going to get but then there's always something else that follows on. and one is, the behavior of voters with an expectation, particularly in an era of e-government. why shouldn't my records and ballots be available where ever i choose to go? the second thing, and military installations if you want to improve the child halls, the general always makes the food better. one of the things i think is interesting with election officials is how many of us vote on election day. how many of us experience that line, that q. and the answer is, most of us vote absentee because of that responsibility. so one of the things i've tried to do over the years is ideal in advance to ago and i stand in line and i learned a lot. i learnt a lot by listening to people, but that may be something as a professional goal for each of us is experienced the line come experience the way, experience the location. all right? >> my name is lorenzo. i have almost 10 months experience in the selection process. i worked at a trainer an
were not prepared for that. ongoing litigation. it was constantly, election administration was constantly embattled in a court. courts would intervene, state supreme court would make an emergency decision that secretary of state would decide whether to appeal the decision. it caused a lot of inconsistency and uneasiness going into the election not knowing how our provisional ballot would be counted, not knowing if it was a poll worker's responsibility or the voter's responsibility to fill out the provisional envelope, not knowing if we would have extended hours or weekend hours, preparing all that transcended into our budget, transcended into issues, do we have additional parking, do we get more temporaries, do we open in house voting stations, all contingent on the turnout. that would be at the board based on those decisions. in litigation, out comes by the secretary of state and other interested parties. early voting became a hot-button issue in ohio. that is one event. recommendations as an election administrator, the need to -- for consistent uniformity across the state
roosevelt was elected to president of the united states and became known among many things as the conservation president. it was his vision as president that jumpstarted the preservation movement in this country and gather here today we continue on with the effort to develop public policy that promotes the same ideals as tr did long ago. i have the privilege of being able to absorb what roosevelt experienced as i walk on the very same lands and see the same views he did so long ago. it was my time as governor of north dakota for a saturday to understand the public policy can be used to nudge along the same ideals and help conserve the foundations of our country. when i shared the western governors association, the group of 18 states goes from the country west, very involved in resource issues, we were shepherding the grand canyon visibility study. i was shocked when a regional epa administrator can then and was promoting the idea that north dakota should clean up the air better. i pointed out north dakota was the first state to meet the clean air standards, i was mining and
president, but the opposition is calling for a caretaker government and elections. we host a debate. a victory in the campaign against stop and frisk. >> going to the store in coming from the store, they're going to stop you. >> they stop about 90% of the people coming in. >> i don't mind the police being here, but not the harassment. >> new york police are not allowed to routinely stop pedestrians outside private residential buildings in the bronx. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. at least five people have been killed in u.s. drone strike in pakistan earlier today. the strike hit a home in north waziristan. it was at least the seventh u.s. drone strike in less than two weeks. the attack comes as the cia nominee john brennan continues to come under scrutiny for his role in the obama administration's drone warfare overseas. in his remarks at the time, brennan had said there was not a single collateral death in the previous year of drone attacks. his letter qualified his remarks by saying he had no i
been active in democratic circles. she was the national director for howard dean's 24 -- 2004 election. she helped to unseat an 18 year republican incumbent. stephanie also managed the campaign of senator frank and i and minnesota. she defeated norm coleman, correct? she is a graduate of c-span.o [indiscernible] university in minnesota. she has a lot to say and then we will field questions from all of you. thank you, stephanie. >> thank you all so much for coming out. good morning. again, my name is stephanie schriock, president of emily's list. as mentioned, i grew up in butte, montana, where my heart and soul still reside. special thanks to the national press club for setting the solemn. it really is an honor for me to be here today. for those of you who do not know as much about emily's list, emily's list has been around for 27 years. we are solely committed to electing pro-choice democratic women to office up and down the ballot across the country. as mentioned, we had a good election cycle in 2012. two years before that, and would save like most folks, i was ready to see the 112th
the past four years, and into the recent election, the issue of health care has been at the center of our nation's great policy debates with implications beyond the health care industry packing our large -- impacting our larger fiscal policy and social concerns. we are fortunate to have with us today mr. brussard to share insights on the developing policy. prior to joining humana in 2011, he was an executive with the corporation, and before that, u.s. oncology. large producers and providers of health care products to major health care institutions. with that background, mr. brussard brings to the podium today a broad perspective on the health care issues facing the country. he has an undergraduate degree from texas texas a&m, and mba fm university of houston. we look forward to your comments today on this very important topic. thanks for being here. [applause] >> thank you, thank you, everyone. [applause] >> well, thank you, and i really appreciate the opportunity to address each one of you. as we talk today, our nation is actually wrestling with one of the largest issues probably in a lo
to write any checks until i hear something that makes sense to me. since the election there have been a lot of gatherings and meetings among those who are active in raising money. the question is are we united in drying that up from the people i have talked to? the answer is yes. krystal ball, when you have lost the socialites, i believe the republicans have nothing left to lose. >> well, it -- >> what else is there? this is rock bottom? >> it looks pretty bleak. >> a hack, fundraiser. >> she had strong words there, well, i was looking back at the analysis "the washington post" did last summer regarding the republican party, and the sort of old republicans which i assume she is, fiscally conservative, typically northeastern, typically well off still make up about 22% of the party. so a decent chunk of the party. and what georgette there shows, they make up a certain amount of the funding base which is why they have had a lock on the republican party. and the innovation for the growth of the tea party is their ability to have larger scale donor movements, smaller dollar to add up to a larger
. and we also just had a little thing called an election. remember that? you know, when just over a month ago, the country rejected republican ideology. but the gop hasn't learned a thing. they're threatening a government shultdown. voting against disaster relief, pushing radical anti-abortion measures. they might actually be funny if they weren't so contemptible. >>> with me now, bob schram, a democratic strategist and columnist for "the daily beast" and abbyhuffington. >>> can the gop learn the chris christie lesson? or are they drinksiing too much from the tea party? >> he's conceivably a very strong candidate for them in 20167. but increasingly, i think he can't be nominated. it's not just that he embraced or worked with the hurricane, it's not just that he called john boehner to account for denying hurricane relief. it's that he uses that word compromise. he believes in governing. and he'd have to run in a party whose primary voters think the first qualification to the presidency is that you hate the dwovt. so i think he's a lock for reelection, i think he's a way forward and i think
elected to not do things as opposed to do things? >> i refer to the tea party class of the congress, they believe they will do precisely what they were elected to do, which is to roll back all obama initiatives and cut spending a lot of them thought that the debt ceiling should not be increased. basically they believe that their job is to obstruct barack obama and then once there is a republican president in place, to have a better business climate with more deregulation or the funding of programs that have never quite been near and dear to them. yes, i think they do believe that. flashing forward a little bit, we have that fiasco of 2011. when we were taken to the brink of a fiscal cliff what we were about to see again, the thinking on the part of the house republicans leadership was maybe our tea party question will realize that compromise is not such a bad thing. the opposite occurred. they went home and the people tend to be the activists of their party and those people tend to be the tea party and they were the ones screaming and asking why did you accept a deal? there have bee
was president of mexico's federal electric institute during the 2006 elections. director general of the mexico based consultancy. senior advisor to the americas program. he is the author of a new book -- [speaking spanish] this is really the basis for understanding why some of the reforms are going on today, and by political parties are taking on a different direction. he is an economist in residence at the school of international service american university. he did his doctoral work at the university of chicago, and was a top economic diplomat in washington at the time of the naphtha negotiations. he was also chief of staff to the governor of the bank of mexico. more recently represented mexico during the task of leading up to the negotiations leading up to the u.s.-mexico initiative. he has been president of a number of key inflection points .uring u.s.-mexica he has served as ambassador to mexico and assistant secretary of state for western hemisphere affairs. is an author as well. remember his fabulous book, "the u.s. and mexico." he is now a senior counselor with the common group. -- cohe
to justify. you know how the sunlight foundation added up political spending in this past election to see who got the most bang for their buck in their political spending? it was really bad on the right. the republican party's house campaign committee spent almost $65 million, but only 32% of what they spent went to campaigns in which their candidate was successful. so two-to-one, their money was spent on losing. it was worse for the republican party's senate campaign. for their investment of $32 million, only 24% paid off in terms of races that went the way they wanted to. three to one, their money was spent losing. freedomworks was about the same. and the chamber of commerce, which is supposed to be such an impressible and unassailable campaign juggernaut, the chamber of commerce spent $32 million, but less than 7% of what they spent went to winning candidates they wanted to win, or against losing candidates that they wanted to lose. less than 7%. they were 93% ineffective in what they spent. even worse than that was karl rove's american crossroads, which was like the conservative politics
of -- by december 2011, there was a number of elections in iraq which was to the good, but iraq had not fully become a democracy in the sense there was not a peaceful transfer of power from the current regime led to another prime minister. that's a true test of a democracy is whether there's not merely an election, and russia has elections, i serve there, but whether there's an election, another candidate wins, and power is handed over to that candidate. iraq is in the at that milestone yet. what we had in december 2011 was a relatively stable iraq, a lot of hopes, but, i think, unfortunately, the situation in iraq has deteriorated politically over the past year, and, also, iraq has been less aligned with american interests and more aligned with actually iranian interests in as far as the serian conflict is concerned. >> host: phone lines open now so feel free. democrats 202-585-3880, and independents, 202-585-3882. let us know if you received in iraq as well, and your thoughts on what's happening now. phone lines open. i want to go back to the political situation in iraq. talk about prime minister
is stephanie schriock. she is the president of emily's list. guest: this election was a mandate for women's leadership across the country. an historic number of women were sworn in it to congress last week. this election was also about women voters and women's issues, some of which i would prefer not having a debate about. we will see more and more women stepping up to run. host: 20 senators, 81 representatives in 2013. what issues to the brink when it comes to women's issues? guest: we have never had 20 women in the u.s. senate. it is a great benchmark to hit. i would like to see it at 50. we're adding diversity to the debate. we will end up with policies that are best for our committees. these women are bringing different perspectives on all sorts of issues including economics, education, the environment. i think you'll see a lot of different thoughts and ideas on how to get things done and how to find compromise. host: how does a play out with women in leadership roles? guest: we have a new number of women serving on committees and shares. barbara mikulski is the first women's chair of
, involving people who are local democratic elected officials, union lerdz, local party officials, and grassroots activists beloved in the communities, and we would e-mail districts of those who support benefit cuts, and say, hey, who wants to run for congress? >> host: have you launched that warning to some members of congress? >> we have. we have launched it publicly, and we have a more generic sense saying it's a warning. we want to be transparent, and, honestly, we don't yearn for the war on the left. it's ironic for us, me, woke up in 2008 and thought what can i do today to get barack obama elected president. having fight a democratic president on social security and just to be clear, he put -- he publicly admitted he put social security benefit cuts on the table. that is not a position i want to be in. that's not what i worked for in 2008, and what some of the other people worked for >> host: worked for it in 2012? regretting working for the president? >> our organization prioritized congress in 2012. the number one candidate was elizabeth warren calling out the ig and big w
practices at the time until late into the 20th century, and so they not only falsified the elections that followed, that proceeded independence. they falsified even the senseless. now, this was in custody, if you check the notes of the so-called home office which is where the colonies of the british are administered, they look for the book of harold smith, a civil servant in nigeria at the time. he got into trouble because he did not want to carry out orders. he was ordered to participate in the falsification of sensors, but falsification of the first elections. in short, the bar was handed over to what they considered the backward north, the feudal north. very suspect because they were radicalized by western ideas, british uncomfortable with that so they left power in the hands of the north. that political dishonesty led to a long story, cutting it short, but led eventually to the very first military cue in nigeria which was staged by -- led by certain southerners from the eastern part. there was a reprisal, and then a series of massacres, civilian massacres which led eventually to
round of elections? solvation does not lie with shutting down the federal government. it has been demonstrated time and time again in a well, the president did win in my district. think what the american public voted for was a stalemate. because they wanted to have some accountability and traparency. >> i agree with that. i'm talking about the power of the house of representatives himself. >> i think that's why we lost this last one. we were progressive. we weren't in front of the issues and we didn't have a discussion with the american peop. i think we do our best work to open that up to all the great ideas on the floor in regular order and put it out there to the american people. 71% of the american people and spending cuts. lou: your leadership chose to go one-on-one with the president. and speaker boehner says he's not going to do that again. he has moved to regular order. you're on the right in the house of representatives, republicans were insisting upon that all along. he has changed his position and the american people have to be slightly perplexed that now the only way to
election. but most of them, honestly, were from the republican primaries. come on. very few of the laugh out loud moments from the last election involved president obama himself telling a laugh out loud deadpan joke. but it did happen once. >> i think governor romney maybe hasn't spent enough time looking at how our military works. you mentioned the navy, for example, and that we have fewer ships than we did in 1916. well, governor, we also have fewer horses and bayonets because the nature of our military's changed. we have these things called aircraft carriers where planes land on them. we have ships that go underwater. nuclear submarines. >> ships that go underwater. after that moment in the third presidential debate last year there was a brief but fascinating flurry of really earnest fact checking about the question of whether or not there really are fewer bayonets in the u.s. military right now. remember? tmz had an exclusive inside scoop on outrage from the bayonet community. "we are not obsolete." in fact, the last famous bayonet charge in american history was in 1951 during the ko
. >> yeah. so, look, all in all, how is 2013 going to be compared to 2012? we have u.s. elections, i.t. companies, business from the u.s. there's a lot of uncertainty over the fiscal cliff. has there been a withdraw of investment but maybe it will bounce back? albeit, you've still got to get through debt ceiling and other negotiations. >> i think 2013 compared to 2012 and 2013, 2013 will be more positive. for the election year in europe and considering most of the companies infrastructure is more than 50% of the exposure to the u.s. market. most companies who have their renewal budgets, they tried to push it to the next year, the election budgets. so most companies do have good exposure to the u.s. i think 2013 is still better than 2013 compared to 2012. >> there's a lot of talk about on-shoring of business by the u.s. certainly with regard to manufacturing, you've got the natural gas boom in the u.s. which is making it much more attractive for the u.s. to manufacture stuff on-shore as well as 3g, 2g manufacturing. are there any factors on the software side that can have an impact on
their demand for fresh elections and called off a rival demonstration of their own. for now, there is no power vacuum. despite his absence. >> for more on his health, i am joined by the one who formerly served as the director of the central bank. he is so reviled here in washington and you see those people turning out for an inauguration where he is not present and this is not in north korea situation where there are forced in, they really love him. >> his talent is the ability to connect with the people and that he is taking care of their interests. and without him, they would be bereft of any protection. >> what kind of country are we going to find? >> a deeply divided country. it is divided, as you saw, from those that don't like him and those that adore him. that is not a social divide. in which the middle class doesn't like him and the poor does. 45% voted against him. the country doesn't have a middle class. in order to get 45% of the vote, that means the millions of poor people voted against him, but people also voted for him. they have a very strong an almost spiritual connection with
decision in the wake of president obama's re-election. the republican party is divided. that's being isolated and ignored by the right wingers. that's a problem for the gop. that southern dominance may sentence the entire party to irrelevance. >>> conservative ideologues are itching for another fight with president obama, this time saying they may shut down the government altogether or risk a credit catastrophe. could somebody remind these guys who won the election, again. >>> plus, the nra has made its position clear. the answer to gun violence, more guns. we have evidence that posting armed guards everywhere has the exact opposite effect. the latest battle lines as the obama administration moves to curb the availability of assault weapons. >>> let me finish with why this nomination of chuck hagel should be given a solid, solid chance, and this is "hardball," the place for politics, >>> hillary clinton is back at work at the state department. this morning she chaired the weekly meeting of the department's leadership team, and one thing on the agenda will be testifying on capitol hil
, by december of 2011, they're had been a number of elections in iraq, which is to the good, but iraq hadn't fully become a democracy in the sense that it hadn't been a peaceful transfer of power from the current regime led by maliki to another pamela starr. i think that is a true test of democracy is whether there isn't an election and russia has elections as i served there there's another candidate wins and power is handed over to that candidate. iraq hasn't set that milestone yet. so, what we had in december of 2011 was a relatively stable iraq, a lot of hopes, but i think unfortunately the situation in iraq was deteriorated politically over the last year and also iraq has been less aligned with american interests in that more aligned with the irony interest in so far as the search conflict is concerned. >> host: we are taking your calls and questions in this segment, so feel free. the phone lines are open now. republicans, 202-737-0002, democrats, 585-8882. if you served in iraq we want to have your thoughts on what's happening now. phone lines are open. we want to go back to the polit
. ♪ >>> energized by his re-election and that fiscal cliff deal, president obama is now taking ogg on two of washington's most powerful special interest groups. pro-gun and pro-israel lobbies. dominating chuck hagel point to a president unafraid of going head to head with two powerful lobbying groups that have long wheeleded strong influence in washington. i'm joined by national journal political correspondent beth rinehart who writes about the president's busting second term. >> thanks for having me. >> the president is relishing his approval numbers and the fact that he didn't have to run again. he actually talked about the second term on "meet the press." i want to play that. >> one of the nice things about never having another election again. i will never campaign again. is you know, i think you can rest assured that all i care about is making sure i leave behind an america that is stronger, more prosperous, more stable and secure than when i first came into office. >> the first thing, rahm emanuel when chief of staff, had this policy, you don't take on a fight that you don't have a r
baseball writers. >> this is one whait means to be elected from the hall of fame. so consider irony when baseball traditionally honors its best, this time, reopened an old wound exposing the worst. >> i think baseball never figured out how to process steroid era. it's awkward for the game and fans. this is more awkwardness. >> lance will gyms not a baseball writer but on a day they elect nod one its safe so-to-say they influence them, writers like mark purdy when abstained. >> i did not vote for ware barry bonds, roger clemens, sammy sosa, mike piazza. >> all are great player who's otherwise have been shoo ins without steroid autos people asked them to vote in this election. one of the guidelines is supposed to consider sportsman ship. all right? to me, if you cheated that is addressing those issues. i still don't have information about what the whole landscape looked like. to some, the hall of fame is about performance, art did vote for bonds. >> barry bonds deserves to be in the hall of fame. a man who wins seven cy yungz deserves to be now.. >> so many great names, so many questions s
he won the election, wendell willkie, fuji beach, was in the office and they remained friends. he said to the president why do you keep that man so close to you, that man being hopkins. wilkie didn't like hopkins and roosevelt said you know, you may be in this office some day and you'll understand. but he asks for nothing except to serve me. >>> now to the university of alabama law school in tuscaloosa for a discussion of labor and employment law. civil rights leaders and retired federal judge u.w. clemon spoke to students about the history of title seven of the civil rights act. this is about an hour. >> on behalf of the society and the american constitutional society, we'd like to welcome you all today to a remarkable speaker, the honorable u.w. clemon. the former chief judge of the united states district court for the northern district of alabama. long before his notable career on the federal bench, justice u.w. clemon distinguished himself as a civil rights activist, lawyer and alabama state senator. as a student educated in the segregated public schools of jefferson county, h
of the seven u.s. presidents re-elected since world war ii have been less popular in the second terms. so can the president use early momentum to push the policy agenda? let's spin. guys, i have been saying for a while now i think that his second term he's going the see a lot more pushback from the friends on the left than his foes on the right. for one, he's been re-elected. i think the gop has generally resigned themselves to the fact that they're going to be four more years to obama and they have a little less incentive to hang him for every misstep he has but democrats are incentives to watch him more carefully. one, payment, you know, a number of groups, unions for one, invested heavily in barack obama's re-election and i'm sure they want some roi now. two, accountability on the promises the president made in the first term, promises on gay marriage, promises on immigration, maybe promises on guns now. and third, this idea of a liberal legacy. think i that a number of folks on the left were willing to forego or ignore some of the issues in his first term that now they're looking at. the
know, you get elected officials you deserve, and i know this. i'm a politician. they respond to pressure, and they respond to incentives, and unless -- we always push the attention to washington or to trenton, albany, or city hall, but we can organize. we have the power to exercise pressure, demands, influence on our elected officials. so we have to get much more active if we're going to have a society that is going to respond to this enduring problem. the rate of child poverty in the united states of america, we should be ashamed a nation this strong has child poverty, and the kids in poverty don't have the access to success, good education, nutritionally fit to learn, material ready to learn, and that's the lie or that's the incompleteness that we have to address. that when kids stand up in certain neighborhoods and kids stand up in more affluent neighborhoods and say those words, liberty and justice for all, when they pledge allegiance to the flag, the phrase, accomplish justice for all,shoo be a demand, compelling as separation, and should be a conscious conviction to mak
it was unaware of the pastor's prior stance at the time he was elected. a new study has found up to half of all food worldwide is going to waste. britain's institution of mechanical engineers sayat least 1.2 billion of the 4 billion tons of food produced each year is thrown out due to problems with harvesting, transporting and storage, as well as wasteful behavior from sellers and consumers. the report calls food wastage -- the findings come as nations across the globe continue to grapple with soaring food prices. brendan cox of the group save the children said the soaring food costs threaten to cause more unnecessary deaths. >> there is a new normal of the food crisis. and the last year we have seen wheat increased by 25%. already around 3 million children die every year as a result of malnutrition. what could happen next year could make the situation much worse. >> fears of a spike in food prices have run after a long standing drought prompted the obama administration to declare a natural disaster in large parts of the midwest. conditions in the courtroom and we producing states -- kansas, co
. >> woodruff: karzai has been dogged by charges of fraud since his re-election, part of larger concerns about corruption in his government. he acknowledged the concerns today, and said he hopes for a proper election to name his successor. >> brown: we pick up on today's meeting with two men with extensive experience in managing u.s.-afghan relations. said jawad was afghanistan's ambassador to washington from 2003 to 2010. before that, he was president karzai's chief of staff. and peter tomsen was a career diplomat who served as special envoy on afghanistan during the george h.w. bush administration. he's the author of "the wars of afghanistan." peter tomsen, let's start with you. what jumps out at you. help us decode what was in that meeting, what was most pournt. >> is think what jumped out at me mostly was the acceleration in the transition. which i think is good. that american troops are going to be leaving at a faster clip. and also on the function side, so to speak that the role of american troops in combat as was mentioned in the clip is going to be phased out. also, what president karz
was about keeping washington in check. not this time. >> presidents have a way of getting re-elected and deciding how about i do what i want to do. how about i choose who i'm comfortable with. and they have extra confidence that they can do that. and they should be able to do it. and -- >> there is sort of -- you know, it's -- by the way, it's also why they've had this diversity issue a little bit, not thinking about that. >> it doesn't explain why he didn't stand behind susan rice. if that was really his view. he's choosing the fight over hagel, in part i'm sure because he gave up on susan rice. why didn't he do it for her? >> it's possible he never was for susan the way others were. there really was a split in that white house. >> it looked like it had touched a personal cord with him when she was being criticized. may be separate from whether he wanted her for the job. i think the attitude is what's driving this on hagel. and i think his comfort level, his knowledge that if he's going to deal with defense budget cuts, he wants a republican in there. i'm not sure as andrea mitchell
is behind me. i won this election convincingly. now, i'm not sure how much the debt ceiling played into the election for average voters, but i think president obama is trying to say, look, i have a mandate. i won a second term amid this economic crisis, amid questions about my handling of it, and now it's up to you guys, whether you want to deal with me or deal with the consequences. >> and he knows the difference in his popularity compared to the congressional popularity. >> right. >> susan page, we talked about this on friday. now, the question that jackie of the "new york times" asked of the president. the lack of diversity in his frontline cabinet appointments so far, this was his response. >> i would just suggest that everybody kind of wait until they've seen all my appointments, who is in the white house staff and who is in my cabinet before they rush to judgment. >> well, was that compelling and persuasive and convincing? >> well, i think we should expect the next appointments to have some female faces, whether they're top aides to the treasury secretary or the new budget di
to do, it puts a real check and balance, even china which is certainly not an elected country, it's sensitive to public criticism if you look at the train accident, which is their version of twitter, disciplined the party chief who was in charge of building up the railways. this guy who was seen as a god is on his way to prison because of corruption. think about the terrible things that go on in the world to people who are at the with him of the police chief or minorities or the terrible status that women are treated in much of the developing world. people have cameras. you can now anonymously report things. you can imagine a network where a bad thing is occurring. you can report it anonymously. you can have anonymous responders. you can build those kind of networks and they're in development now. the fact that everybody is connected has a large number of step functions and improvement there. think about health care. we were talking earlier in the video about 2050 about health care and people sort of snickered when the gentleman mentioned to it, the f.d.a. just approved the first
. look at the banker bailouts that we have had. henry paulson, even in the elections when congress voted it down the first time, the banker bail out the last month or so of george bush's administration. obama and mccain came off of the campaign trails. they got on the phone and they got the congressional black caucus to change their votes and twist some arms and it passed and obama became president. i announcing that is why he became president, but you have to look at where the money is coming from. host: he is asking questions about jack lew, the next secretary of treasury. dave clark from politico joins us to learn a little bit more about him. to the caller pose a question about his background, particularly about wall street, can you tell us and on his experiences there and what he brings to the white house? caller: most of his background is predominantly a denture washington. he was a top house aide for a long time. he worked in the clinton administration. in the obama administration he was also the director as well working at the state department. he did spend two or three years, 200
champion in the years to come. to have some kind of revolution but when the next election for speaker happens to republican conference conservatives especiallespeciall y within the caucus will remember how cantor handled the fiscal cliff and that may help them. there were other high-profile republicans who voted it had interestiinteresti ng votes. paul wright in the house voted for it. marco rubio on the senate votes no on it. what he think the implications are about? >> guest: to see there are 2016 implications is a little far-fetched but if you love politics you have to look at it. when i was inside of the house chamber watching the fiscal vote, he really is a power player within the party. one of the most important things he is done since the campaign is aligned himself for speaker john boehner and a lot of people did not expect this. one of the the reasons his dumbest and i've spoken people who are close to right write is he wants to make 2013 if budget year. in order to do that he needs boehner support so i don't think ryan will actively break with boehner. >> guest: we have not
election because of controversial statements on the israeli reluctance. among the reason for that concern and in some cases outright opposition. seven of the 12 republican members of the armed services committee expressing some opposition with at least three senators already saying they will vote no. senator david fisher saying, i will be a no-vote and on the floor. south carolina senator lindsay gramm calling hegel and antagonistic and in-your-face nomination to all of those who support israel. freshman senator ted crews of texas absolutely unloading while calling him too weak for the job >> it is interesting. the president seems bound and determined to proceed down this path despite the fact that his record is troubling. he has not been a friend, and in my view, the united states should stand unshakeable with the nation of israel, and he is consistently advocating weakness with respect to our enemies, with respect to the nation of iran, he has exposed sanctions, and the job of the secretary of defense is to be a serious, credible strength and a deterrent and, unfortunately, i think weak
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